Princess’ angel book flies south

A book co-authored by Norway’s Princess Martha Louise, which aims to help its readers find their own guardian angel, has developed some wings of its own. New, translated versions will be coming out further south in Europe and the princess will set off on a new publicity tour.

The angel book's authors Elisabeth Samnøy (left) and Princess Martha Louise. PHOTO: Astarte Education

The book, Møt din skytsengel (Meet your guardian angel), was controversial in Norway but sold well. While some argued that the princess was inappropriately exploiting her royal title for commercial purposes, Norwegians bought the book by King Harald’s daughter and her business partner Elisabeth Samnøy.

Now they hope to find buyers in Germany, Austria and Switzerland as well. News bureau NTB reported that they’ll set off on a promotional tour, visiting Berlin, Munich, Hamburg, Offenburg and Salzburg when the book comes out in German.

The book is also due out in Swedish in May. “This is a fantastic opportunity to reach a bigger audience,” the two authors said in a prepared statement.

Princess Martha Louise has gained a reputation as an unconventional royal, gathering large crowds when she reads fairy tales for a paying public, promotes alternative healing methods and, most recently, spiritual pursuits that also have raised eyebrows because of her father’s role as symbolic head of the state church. 

The two authors also run what’s popularly called their “angel school” in Oslo, which also is billed as a “self-development” course that can help participants communicate with angels. Norwegian Broadcasting (NRK) reported this week that it’s not included, nor is the book, in the princess’ biography on the official website for Norway’s royal family. A palace official insisted the omission had nothing to do with the nature of the princess’ work.

The two authors were also in the news this week when they filed a formal complaint with a media watchdog group in Norway. They’re unhappy that a journalist for a newspaper in Bergen registered as a student at their angel school and then wrote about conflicts at the school, without informing them in advance.

By Views and News staff