Princess feels persecuted

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Princess Martha Louise met with reporters just before the weekend, mostly to try to promote another one of her books but also to once again chide the press for criticizing her over the years. Especially the (not so gentle) men of the press.

Princess Martha Louise, shown here arriving at last weekend's memorial services for terror victims, plans to move to London soon. PHOTO: Views and News

Princess Martha Louise, shown here arriving at a memorial service for terror victims in Oslo, remains fourth in line to the Norwegian throne and continues to use her “princess” title in her commercial business ventures. She recently said she’d feel “naked” without her title although it was downgraded when she married a commoner. PHOTO: newsinenglish.no

“There were always men from the press who followed after me,” she told news bureau NTB. “There was a period when I was followed by pressmen, they were always men, who sat in their cars outside where I lived 24 hours a day.”

The princess, now age 43, also claimed that men from the press “sat in the bushes, or they sat far away with telephoto lenses.” Asked why she stressed that they were men, the princess claimed “well they were often men.”

After another recent round of criticism, mosts recently from Norwegian bishops who disapproved of her promoting and commercially benefiting from someone who claims to speak to the dead, Martha Louise met with various reporters as she often does when it suits her purposes and she has a new product to sell. This time it’s another book written with her business partner Elisabeth Nordeng, about how “to be true towards yourself.”

A flurry of media coverage thus appeared over the weekend, in local newspapers, on the NTB wire and on Saturday’s nationwide evening newscast on NRK, Lørdagsrevyen. The latter provided a glimpse into how the princess and Nordeng conduct their so-called angel school, which aims to help people get in touch with their own angels. The video taken inside their “classrooms” mostly showed the princess and Nordeng meditating with their clients, apparently trying to summon the spiritual energy needed to recognize and communicate with the angels. A few of the clients, all of whom were women, told NRK they were satisfied and felt the course contributed to their self-development.

Nordeng also claimed that most of the criticism and ridicule the two receive comes from “older men” who she thinks “feel challenged” by the spiritual topics that form the brunt of their business. “And then it’s easy to resort to criticism,” Nordeng said, even though the princess quickly interjected that women also criticize them.

“Men are very preoccupied with concrete things,” Nordberg went on nonetheless. “Spirituality, and self-development are intuitive. It’s easier to blast it.”

newsinenglish.no staff