Krekar sparks more outrage

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Islamic extremist Mullah Krekar continued to provoke Norwegian authorities and the public in general on Wednesday after he unleashed another string of alarming statements in an interview with Norwegian Broadcasting (NRK). Prime Minister Erna Solberg, who’s been threatened by Krekar herself, said that Krekar exhibited “extreme attitudes” that aren’t shared by the majority of Muslims.

Mullah Krekar has been in the news, and been a problem for Norwegian authorities, for years. PHOTO: NRK screen grab/Views and News

Mullah Krekar, who came to Norway as a refugee and has been causing trouble and costing taxpayers ever since, claims he’s just interpreting Islamic law as he sees it. Others claim he’s perverting an otherwise peaceful religion. PHOTO: NRK screen grab/Views and News

Krekar claimed, for example, that he was pleased by the recent terrorist attacks in Paris, that anyone who draws pictures the Prophet Mohammed deserves to die, and that he would send a gift to anyone who kills one of the Kurds that he earlier was convicted of threatening.

His  brash statements generated the publicity Krekar seems to thrive on, with the prime minister, the justice minister and several leading muslims in Norway reacting publicly. Justice Minister Anders Anundsen said he was frightened by Krekar’s statements, while leading muslims wish Krekar would simply be ignored.

“Mullah Krekar has no credibility when it comes to Islamic theology,” Dr Mohammad Usman Rana, a doctor and local commentator on Islam, told NRK. “Even though he puts on a turban and robes, that doesn’t make him an Islamic scholar.”

Bushra Ishaq, another local muslim commentator, was also disgusted by Krekar’s remarks. “He justifies the murder of civilians,” she told NRK. “He stands for a perverted view of the world and he directly encourages acts of terrorism. He has a beard, but he is not theologist. Most of us muslims feel he has hijacked our faith.”

Brynjar Meling, Krekar’s longtime defense attorney who’s currently trying to prevent Krekar from being confined in a small Norwegian village pending deportation, said he hadn’t been told that Krekar had agreed to an interview with NRK. He told NRK that he thinks Krekar and the media thrive on each other. He wouldn’t speculate on whether Krekar’s statements can lead to new criminal charges of encouraging terrorism or making threats.

newsinenglish.no/Nina Berglund