‘No travel abroad’ until after Easter

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Norwegian airports are likely to remain unusually quiet, also during the country’s long Easter holidays, after the Foreign Ministry extended its recommendations against global travel until April 15. The ministry’s latest travel advisory applies to all trips to all countries that aren’t strictly necessary.

There still won’t be many travelers passing through customs at Norwegian airports until after the Easter holidays at the earliest. PHOTO: Avinor OSL Lufthavn/Espen Solli

There already are advisories against unnecessary travel within Norway as well. The Foreign Ministry’s new evaluation also dashes hopes for popular spring holidays abroad in warmer climes.

“Even though we’ve been dealing with the pandemic for a year now, we’re still far from any normal situation,” Foreign Minister Ine Eriksen Søreide stated in a press release Tuesday morning. She also stressed that “the infection situation many places around the world can change quickly.”

Her ministry, backed by the government, isn’t easing travel restrictions in its latest evaluation of Corona virus infection risks. They have functioned, the ministry noted, as infection prevention measures throughout the pandemic, in combination with quarantine rules and entry restrictions. Norway’s borders are closed at present, but may reopen later this week.

Travel remains challenging at best
The ministry noted that many other countries have entry restrictions, too, and that it’s challenging to travel abroad and keep up various rules and regulations that also are constantly changing. Several countries have sharpened their rules in line with worsening infection, not least since new  and even more contagious strains of the Corona virus have emerged.

Such changes and risk of cancelled flights can also strand travelers abroad. The ministry noted that its own ability to help with any such issues at its embassies or consulates is currently “extremely limited.”

The ministry is constantly evaluating exceptions for travel to areas with low infection in the European Economic Area. At present the only exceptions apply to Iceland, the Færoe Islands and Greenland, along with a few areas of Finland.

newsinenglish.no/Nina Berglund