Farms now able to sell their cider

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After years of trying, farms producing alcoholic beverages from, for example, apples and pears can now sell them on location instead of having to distribute them through the state wine and liquor monopoly Vinmonopolet.

Agriculture Minister Jon Georg Dale on his way out of the farm shop set up at Egge Gård in Lier. At left, cider producer Marius Egge. PHOTO: Landbruksdepartementet

Agriculture Minister Jon Georg Dale on his way out of the farm shop set up at Egge Gård in Lier. At left, cider producer Marius Egge. PHOTO: Landbruksdepartementet

Agriculture Minister Jon Georg Dale was the first customer at the farm Egge Gård in Lier. “The change in the alcohol law that now takes effect (on July 1) means that farmers can make use of their resources on the farm in a much better way,” Dale said. “Farmers get more legs to stand on and it can create more jobs in rural districts.”

Local tourism industry officials have also promoted the on-site sale of farm products. Dale’s predecessor from the Progress Party, Sylvi Listhaug, actively promoted sales of alcoholic cider, for example, as have other agriculture ministers before her.

Norwegian producers of liquor, beer and wine made from grapes aren’t covered by the latest liberalization of the law, though, and must still distribute their products through Vinmonopolet. Those wanting to sell the products now allowed, from fruit fermentation for example, must also seek approval from their local municipality.

newsinenglish.no staff