Breivik’s e-mail branded as ‘boring’

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A new book that’s based on more than 7,000 e-mails sent and received by convicted mass murderer and right-wing terrorist Anders Behring Breivik “is no page-turner, to put it mildly,” according to one Norwegian commentator. He thinks Breivik’s e-mail was downright “boring.”

The e-mail, handed over to Norwegian freelance journalist Kjetil Stormark by hackers who dug into Breivik’s e-mail accounts following his arrest last summer, now forms the basis of a 322-page book released by Stormark and publishing firm Spartacus this week. Stormark had earlier handed over the e-mail to police following Breivik’s attacks that killed 77 persons on July 22, 2011.

The book has attracted media coverage but made no sensation. Stian Bromark, a commentator for Oslo newspaper Dagsavisen, noted, for example, that most of the e-mails are short and related to business transactions carried out by Breivik before he went on his murderous rampage. In them, Breivik corresponds with prospective buyers of such things as an expensive watch, a rifle, a car and a set of snow tires. The tone is friendly, and Breivik signs them “Best regards, Anders Behring,” omitting his last name.

More worrisome, according to Bromark, are the mails Breivik received just after his attacks that included expressions of support, messages that what Breivik had done was the work of a “genius” and mail from one fan who simply wrote “I love you.”

The e-mail, according to Stormark, supports the court’s determination that Breivik was not affected by insanity and instead carefully planned his attacks. Some of the e-mails involve orders for the fertilizer he used in his bomb and blue lights that helped him portray himself as a police officer. The material, however, was illegally obtained by the hackers, raising ethical questions about their publication not least from Breivik’s defense lawyer Geir Lippestad.

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